Ebm(add9) guitar chord chart with explanation

Ebm(add9)

The Cm(add9) chord is a minor chord with an additional 9th, but without a 7th (which would be inluded in the Cm9 chord). The Cm(add9) chord consists of the tones C (1), Eb (m3), G (5) and D (9).

The tone D is written as 9 and not 2, because 9 is a chord extension, while 2 means a modification of the base chord and only exists as sus2 that would replace the 3rd.

Unlike major chords, that are dramatically changed by adding a 7th, minor chords can in most styles be played with a 7th even if it just a plain minor chord is written. Or the other way round: played without a 7th, although the chord symbol says m7. Conclusion: m(add9) chords are mosty a result of playing a m9 chord in a way that doesn’t leave space for a 7th on the guitars fretboard. In most cases you should prefer writing a Cm9 chord on your music sheet and then just play it with or without the 7th depending on your chord shape respectively voicing (order of intervals).

Ebm(add9)

The Cm(add9) chord is a minor chord with an additional 9th, but without a 7th (which would be inluded in the Cm9 chord). The Cm(add9) chord consists of the tones C (1), Eb (m3), G (5) and D (9).

The tone D is written as 9 and not 2, because 9 is a chord extension, while 2 means a modification of the base chord and only exists as sus2 that would replace the 3rd.

Unlike major chords, that are dramatically changed by adding a 7th, minor chords can in most styles be played with a 7th even if it just a plain minor chord is written. Or the other way round: played without a 7th, although the chord symbol says m7. Conclusion: m(add9) chords are mosty a result of playing a m9 chord in a way that doesn’t leave space for a 7th on the guitars fretboard. In most cases you should prefer writing a Cm9 chord on your music sheet and then just play it with or without the 7th depending on your chord shape respectively voicing (order of intervals).